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How to tell when your child needs extra help with math

How to tell when your child needs extra help with math


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Learning about numbers and math concepts is complicated, and many children encounter problems along the way. Some kids just need to overcome minor hurdles while others experience more complicated and enduring struggles that can be a sign of a learning disability.

If you're worried about your child's math skills, talk to his teacher. "Because the teacher sees your child in a variety of situations at school and can compare your child's progress to that of other children, she's in a good position to notice any potential problems," says Eve Stabinsky-Ackert, an early childhood education specialist in Monroe, Conn.

Early warning signs of a math problem

According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities and early education specialists, your child may have a problem learning math and numerical concepts if he:

  • Cries or gets angry when working with numbers
  • Has trouble remembering numbers
  • Can't follow the steps needed to solve simple math problems
  • Insists that he "just can't do it" without even trying
  • Is anxious about math homework and tests
  • Can't add or subtract simple problems in his head or on his fingers
  • Can't think abstractly (he has trouble grasping concepts like "bigger and smaller," "before and after," "older and younger," etc.)

If your child has most or all of these problems, it doesn't necessarily mean he has a learning disability. It may mean he's being pushed before he's ready. That's why it's important to talk to your child's teacher. She's in the best position to make an early assessment. She may recommend that you give him more math practice at home (see our article on fun activities for building a kindergartner's math skills or fun activities for building a 1st grader's math skills) or talk to a learning specialist.


Watch the video: Math supplement for kids 4-13 yrs old. (May 2022).


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